Fun: Day 12: My first lune poem

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And just like that, we’re already on to our second “Two for Tuesday” prompt of the challenge. I know this is a prompt that some poets have been craving, while others probably not so much. Regardless, I did this one on Tuesday to provide some options:

  1. Write a form poem. This could be a sonnet, pantoum, lune, or even something as sinister as a–dare I say it–sestina.
  2. Write an anti-form poem. Just as there are poets who love playing with forms, there are poets who think they are the worst thing ever. That’s fine. Express (in either free verse or a prose poem) your feelings on writing in traditional forms. (source: poeticasides.org)

Note from Cheryl: I’ve never written a lune, so I looked it up and wrote one about current events in Florida since our state legislature is in session. It’s more of a comment on the day and thinking that seems to be coming out of our state capital.

Here’s more information on the lune form from poeticasides.org:

The lune is also known as the American Haiku. It was first created by the poet Robert Kelly (truly a great poet) and was a result of Kelly’s frustration with English haiku. After much experimentation, he settled on a 13-syllable, self-contained poem that has 5 syllables in the first line, 3 syllables in the second line and 5 syllable in the final line.

Unlike haiku, there are no other rules. No need for a cutting word. Rhymes are fine; subject matter is open. While there are less syllables to use, this form has a little more freedom.

A Lune-y Excuse

Spend less on the schools!
They’re costly.
Our state budget stinks!

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